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AIYA! THEY DIDN'T!
Your #1 Source for Chinese and SE Asian Entertainment News!
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10th-Sep-2017 12:17 pm - [sticky post] (new sticky!) intro/junk thread
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Point of post?

To introduce yourself/make friends

Chat about whatever (C-Ent related or not)

Suggest post topics

Recommend music, movies, dramas

Anything else?

General old FFA rules apply, no fighting, no NSFW content, be smart about media spam, etc.

LJ posts can hold hella comments so if it ever fills up I'll make a new one.

3rd-Apr-2018 07:47 pm - Aaron Yan's most recent effort
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The full three song single is on Spotify and it's pretty good actually
1st-Apr-2018 12:48 pm - announcement!
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Since this comm is so boring, I'm changing it into an unpopular opinion comm for Asian entertainment, kinda like jrocksecret back in the day, but with less anonymity. I know it will inevitably be like 90% Kpop, but whatever!  It's sure to be much more fun right?  TOP MAIN RULE: no getting butthurt lol.  Bc that's boring and easily found elsewhere, amirite?

Anyway!  I'll leave all the other posts up though nw.

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carly v d.carly
Understanding the nuances of Chinese culture and people can make or break a movie.

Hollywood has been accused of pandering to Chinese audiences in a shallow and obvious way of wooing audiences and government censors—and in some cases it has affected box office numbers. The Hollywood Reporter reported tepid audience reactions and box office sales to the latest Transformers movie, “Transformers: The Last Knight,” which earned $228 million in China, about 100 million less than its predecessor. The reason for its lackluster showing? Too much nonsensical Chinese product placement.

The remedy for this is both straightforward and complicated: “Be authentic to the audience,” states Chris Bremble, founder and CEO of Emmy Award-winning Beijing-based visual effects company, Base FX. It seems simple, but Hollywood has been grappling with how to make a good movie, while also incorporating Chinese elements to appeal to that target demographic, for a while. Certainly, there are films that perform extraordinarily well in both markets (i.e. “The Fate of the Furious”), but the rising success of domestically produced films over Hollywood exports points to changing tides: Hollywood no longer has as much market share in China as it used to. However, the key to a long-lasting Hollywood-China relationship could be in understanding and genuinely embracing the nuances of Chinese culture in content. 

Understand differences in emotional expression

In China, even the way people outwardly express their emotions is different than in America—getting those emotional beats spot-on is integral for getting audiences to connect to the story. Bremble jokes, “In the U.S., if you love someone, you say, ‘I love you.’ In China, if you love someone, you say, ‘Are you hungry?’”

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Source
Haven't been able to keep up with many new TV or movie releases recently, but I thought this was an interesting read! Anyone watched Wolf Warrior 2?

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Rest of the article @ JayneStars

Basically it never comes to any conclusions one way or the other lol.

Wutchoo think Aiya? Brother or son.
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